4 Exhibits To Visit at the National Museum of Anthropology (Part 2)

Last Updated: May 15th, 2018

 

4 Exhibits To Visit at the National Museum of Anthropology (Part 2)

 

In Part Two of our list of exhibits to visit at the National Museum of Anthropology (formerly Museum of the Filipino People), we will feature some of the most prized historical artifacts that helped shaped our country’s cultural identity.

Read Part 1 here4 Exhibits To Visit at the National Museum of Anthropology (Part 1)

 

Kaban ng Lahi (Archaeological Treasures): National Museum of Anthropology

 

Kaban ng Lahi (Archaeological Treasures)

The Kaban ng Lahi exhibit features the National Museum’s collection of burial jars including samples of other utilitarian vessels found in different cave sites in the country. Among the most notable burial jars currently on display include the:

  • Anthropomorphic burial jars with head-shaped covers recovered from Ayub Cave in Maitum, Sarangani in 1991 that dates back to the Metal Age period from 500 B.C. to 370 A.D.
  • The Manunggul jar, recovered from a Neolithic burial site in Manunggul Cave in Lipuun, Palawan.

Among the other funerary vessels on display include the stone figure from Calatagan, Batangas, the wooden coffin from Banton Island in Romblon, and a drinking vessel from a Neolithic site in Leta-leta Cave in Palawan.

 

Kaban ng Lahi (Archaeological Treasures): National Museum of Anthropology

One of the anthromorphic jars sculpted to represent humans

 

Kaban ng Lahi (Archaeological Treasures): National Museum of Anthropology

Manunggul Jar – a late neolithic burial jar recovered in Lipuun Point, Palawan

 

 

Hibla ng Lahing Filipino: National Museum of Anthropology

 

Hibla ng Lahing Filipino: The Artistry of Philippine Textiles

Spearheaded by Loren Legarda together with the National Museum, this exhibit showcases indigenous artistry through textiles and to celebrate weaving traditions in different parts of the country.

Among those currently on display include the oldest existing textile in the Philippines, the Banton cloth and other traditional outfits from all over the Philippines.

 

Hibla ng Lahing Filipino: National Museum of Anthropology

A Mandaya ensemble worn on special occasions– Caraga, Davao Oriental

 

Hibla ng Lahing Filipino: National Museum of Anthropology

Tilar, Pang-Abelan (Bacnotan, La Union)

 

 

 

Baybayin: Traditional Scripts of the Philippines (National Museum of Anthropology)

 

Baybayin: Traditional Scripts of the Philippines

An exhibit that features the writing systems of ancient Filipinos, Baybayin showcases archaeological artifacts recovered from the Tagalog region, Palawan, and Butuan in southern Philippines. Among the priceless artifacts currently on display include the Laguna copper-plate, Calatagan pot, and the Butuan ivory seal that was declared as a National Cultural Treasure.

Other artifacts featured in the Baybayin exhibit include amulets and talismans, musical instruments, stones, tablets, and swords–all bearing the traditional baybayin scripts.

 

Baybayin: Traditional Scripts of the Philippines (National Museum of Anthropology)

The Butual ivory seal

 

Baybayin: Traditional Scripts of the Philippines (National Museum of Anthropology)

Laguna copper-plate inscription

 

 

 

Entwined Spheres (National Museum of Anthropology)

 

Entwined Spheres: Mats and Baskets as Containers, Costumes and Conveyors

The Entwined Spheres exhibit promotes the collections sourced directly from communities of basket and mat artists. It features palm, fiber and flexible plant materials woven into functional objects.

 

Entwined Spheres (National Museum of Anthropology)

Fish trap (Cagayan, 1998)

 

Entwined Spheres (National Museum of Anthropology)

Sea salt containers (Batolan, Zambales)

 

 

 

Read Part 1 here: 4 Exhibits To Visit at the National Museum of Anthropology (Part 1)

 

The Manila Project

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References:

National Museum of the Philippines

 

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