Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

Kota Kinabalu City Mosque

 

Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

The mosque’s gold and blue dome

 

Kota Kinabalu City Mosque (famously called “The Floating Mosque”) is located in a 6-hectare site along Pasir Road on the shores of Likas Bay. This architectural landmark is considered as one of Southeast Asia’s–and Malaysia’s–most beautiful mosques. With the growing tourism industry of Kota Kinabalu, the mosque has become a tourist destination for the thousands of visitors that visit Borneo every year.

 

1. Kota Kinabalu City Mosque is the second main mosque in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia after the golden-domed Sabah State Mosque.

 

2. Surrounded by a man-made lagoon, the city mosque was given the nickname “The Floating Mosque”.

 

Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

The minarets

 

Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

Tourists trying to take the perfect shot

 

3. Also the largest mosque in Kota Kinabalu, it contains three madrasas that can accommodate anywhere between 9,000 to 12,000 people.

 

4. Construction first started in 1989 and was completed more than a decade later when it was finally opened to the public on February 2000.

 

5. Having incorporated Islamic and modern architecture in its design, the mosque was made to resemble the Prophet’s Mosque (Nabawi Mosque) in the city of Medina in Saudi Arabia–the final resting place of the prophet Mohammad.

 

Heavily influenced by Roman, Byzantine, Persian, Chinese, and Indian architecture, Islamic architecture can be identified with the following design elements: minarets, domes, vaulting, arches, and radiant decorative details.

 

Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

 

Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

 

6. The city mosque’s gold and blue dome is reminiscent to the mosques typically found in the Middle East.

 

7. In June 2018, two Chinese tourists were filmed dancing provocatively in front of the mosque. While they were fined a measly MYR25 each, the incident was widely circulated on social media and gained negative reactions from the predominantly Muslim local community.

 

8. Its construction is said to have cost 34 million Malaysian ringgits (approximately US$8.4 Million).

 

Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

 

Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

 

Kota Kinabalu’s Floating Mosque: 8 Things To Know

 

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Historical references:

  1. Sabah Tourism
  2. Islamic Tourism Centre
  3. South China Morning Post
  4. Discover World
  5. The New York Times
  6. Other news articles

 

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